Chautauqua Institution

Thursday, June 2, through Sunday, June 5, 2016

Co-sponsored by Clarion University, Penn State Erie, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg and Monmouth University.




2016 Faculty



Pamela Painter       
Pamela Painter is the author of three story collections, Getting to Know the Weather, which won the GLCA Award for First Fiction, The Long and Short of It and Wouldn’t You Like to Know.  She is also the co-author of What If? Writing Exercises for Fiction Writers. Her stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Five Points, Harper’s, Kenyon Review, Mid-American Review and Ploughshares, among others and in numerous anthologies. She has received grants from The Massachusetts Artists Foundation and the National Endowment of the Arts, has won three Pushcart Prizes and Agni Review’s The John Cheever Award for Fiction. Painter’s stories have been presented on stage by Word Theatre, Stage Turner and Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theatre.  Her most recent story collection, Ways to Spend the Night is due in winter 2016.



Derek Green
Derek Green is the author of New World Order, a collection of 12 stories set in various locations around the globe, and linked by a fictional Haliburtonesque company. His short fiction has also appeared in literary journals and anthologies. As a journalist, he has published dozens of in-depth features on subjects ranging from trauma and transplant surgery to industrial farming and the international war on terror. He has co-written film projects and has penned several television pilots. He has delivered presentations and workshops in 22 countries on six continents. In addition to his work as a professional writer and speaker, he has taught writing at numerous institutions, including The University of Michigan, the Aspen Institute and Yale University. He is currently at work on a novel about the rise of an armed Midwestern militia, and a second collection of stories.  



GerardPhilip Gerard
Philip Gerard is the author of four novels, including The Dark of the Island, and six books of nonfiction, including Down the Wild Cape Fear — A River Journey Through the Heart of North Carolina and The Patron Saint of Dreams, winner of the 2012 North American Gold Medal in Essay/Creative Nonfiction from The Independent Publisher. Gerard has also written numerous essays, short stories, public radio commentaries, and documentary television scripts. His work has been nationally syndicated by the History News Service and featured on National Public Radio. He has appeared on “All Things Considered,” CNN, CSPAN, and the History Channel. Gerard teaches in the Department of Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where he co-edits Chautauqua. 



Nancy McCabe
Nancy McCabe is the author of four memoirs, most recently From Little Houses to Little Women: Revisiting a Literary Childhood and Crossing the Blue Willow Bridge: A Journey to my Daughter's Birthplace in China. Her work has received a Pushcart and six times made notable lists in Houghton-Mifflin Best American anthologies. Her essays have appeared in numerous magazines, including Prairie Schooner, Fourth Genre, Gulf Coast, and Massachusetts Review, along with three anthologies in 2015: Every Father's Daughter: 24 Women Writers Remember their Fathers; Oh Baby: True Tales about Conception, Adoption, Surrogacy, Pregnancy, Labor, and Love; and A Pink Suitcase: 22 Tales of Women's Travel. She directs the writing program at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Spalding University.





Stephen Dunn
Stephen Dunn is the author of 17 collections of poetry, including the recent Lines of Defense. Other books are Here and Now; What Goes On: Selected & New Poems 1995-2009; Different Hours; Loosestrife; Landscape at the End of the Century; Between Angels; and Riffs & Reciprocities. W.W. Norton will publish a new book of poems, Whereas, in early 2017. Dunn’s many awards include the Pulitzer Prize, the Academy Award in Literature from The American Academy of Arts & Letters, and t he Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He is Distinguished Professor (emeritus) of Creative Writing at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.



Dorianne Laux
Dorianne Laux’s most recent collections are The Book of Men and Facts about the Moon. The Book of Men received The Paterson Prize, and Facts about the Moon won The Oregon Book Award, and was short-listed for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize.  Laux is also the author of Awake and What We Carry, a finalist for the National Book Critic’s Circle Award.S he is the co-author of the celebrated text The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry. Among Laux's awards are two Best American Poetry Prizes, a Pushcart Prize, two fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She teaches poetry in the MFA Program at North Carolina State University and is founding faculty at Pacific University’s Low Residency MFA Program. 



SMinarScott Minar
As a singer-songwriter and creative writing professor at Ohio University Lancaster, Scott Minar has shaped a literary and songwriting career that spans four decades. Minar is the author, co-author, or editor of 5 books, including three college textbooks in poetry writing. His performance credits include shared stages with Richard Thompson, Kim Richey, and a number of other well known singer-songwriters. His band The Kings of Hollywood was one of the most popular "jam bands" and original music groups in Athens, Ohio for over 20 years. From 1997-2000, Minar was founding writer for 22nd Street Music, a New York City-based music publishing and distribution company. He has performed in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia with a variety of acts and in solo performance.



  • Jane McCafferty
  • Aimee Parkison
  • Alberto Álvaro Ríos
  • Jaimy Gordon
  • Jill McCorkle
  • Ron Carlson
  • Lee. K. Abbot
  • Aimee Bender
  • Ron Carlson
  • Dan Chaon
  • Peter Ho Davies
  • Tony Doerr
  • Tony Earley
  • Brian Evenson
  • Abby Frucht
  • Laura Kasischke
  • Jill McCorkle
  • Tom Noyes
  • Pamela Painter
  • Ann Pancake


  • Lia Purpura
  • Steve Almond
  • Tom Bridwell
  • Patsy Sims
  • Philip Gerard
  • Faith Adiele
  • Valerie Boyd
  • Thomas French
  • Philip Gerard
  • Lee Gutkind
  • Diana Hume George
  • Barbara Hurd
  • Mary Karr
  • Greg Kuzma
  • Suzannah Lessard
  • Jacob Levenson
  • Joe Mackall
  • Dinty Moore
  • Leslie Rubinkowski


  • Tim Seibles
  • Tony Hoagland
  • Carl Dennis
  • Malena Mörling
  • Frank X. Gaspar
  • Denise Duhamel
  • Maggie Anderson
  • Robin Becker
  • David Citino
  • Carl Dennis
  • Denise Duhamel
  • Stephen Dunn
  • Frank Gaspar
  • Margaret Gibson
  • William Heyen
  • Patricia Jabbeh Wesley
  • Alicia Ostriker
  • Stanley Plumley
  • Bruce Smith
  • Maura Stanton
  • Michael Waters


  • Scott Minar


Coming soon.

Registration & Rates

Coming soon.

Chautauqua Writers' Festival Directors

Philip Terman’s, (, recent books of poetry include Among the Scribes, The Torah Garden and Rabbis of the Air. His poems have appeared in many journals and anthologies, including Poetry, The Georgia Review, The Kenyon Review, The Sun Magazine, The Autumn House Anthology of Contemporary Poetry, and The New Promised Land: An Anthology of Jewish American Poetry. He teaches creative writing and literature at Clarion University, directs The Bridge Literary Arts Center in Franklin, PA, and is contributing editor for poetry for the journal Chautauqua. Occasionally, Terman performs his poetry with the jazz band Catro.

Sherrie Flick, (, is author of the novel Reconsidering Happiness (Bison Books), the flash fiction chapbook I Call This Flirting (Flume), and the forthcoming short story collection Whiskey, Etc. (Queen’s Ferry Press, March 2016). Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in many journals and anthologies including PloughsharesSmokeLong QuarterlyFlash Fiction ForwardNew Sudden Fiction, and Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie: Midwestern Writers on Food. She teaches in Chatham University’s MFA and Food Studies programs and writes a regular food column for Pittsburgh Quarterly magazine.

Lori Jakiela, (, is the author of the memoirs Miss New York Has Everything, The Bridge to Take When Things Get Serious, and Belief Is Its Own Kind of Truth, Maybe. She is also the author of a poetry collection — Spot the Terrorist! — and several poetry chapbooks.  Her work has been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Creative Nonfiction, The Rumpus, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Brevity and more. She has received a Golden Quill award from the Western Pennsylvania Press Club, multiple Pushcart Prize nominations, and the Outstanding Faculty Award from The University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg. She has been awarded scholarships to The Bread Loaf Writers Conference and The Bennington Summer Workshops, performed her work at Lollapalooza, and was the winner of Pittsburgh's first-ever Literary Death Match. She is a professor of English in the undergraduate writing program at The University of Pittsburgh's Greensburg campus and teaches in the MFA program at Chatham University. Her website is



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2016 Season Information